The map empties

Charles Greenhough, for geograph.org, may have scooped the pool for the the most boring Ordnance Survey Grid Square with TG0645:

TG0645

His comment:

If my map reading is correct this square has a triangle of land at low tide with side approx 50 metres. The only features were two orange buoys a few yards off shore and they do not count because they are on the water. So I believe I have photographed all the land in the grid square in this photo. There is a grid square in the Midlands with one contour line and an HT electricity line crossing one corner which people have claimed is the most boring, but TQ0645 only has a few hundred thousand pieces of gravel, no contours and no electricity, and should take the prize.

The location is Salthouse, on the North Norfolk coast, none too far from my own natal origin. Add a mid-January grey sky to the leaden North Sea, and you have normal for that part of Norfolk.

Another feature of the maps of East Anglia are the expanses marked “disused airfield”. I remember RAF Bircham Newton (last heard of as used by the Construction Industry Training Board), RAF Coltishall and RAF Watton (both used as detention centres), RAF North Creake (where the control tower is a B&B), RAF Langham (like so many, returned to farming), RAF West Raynham, which was where — as a Sea Scout —I first swam in fresh water (and is now housing) …

One that survived for a while was RAF Sculthorpe, in the late-1950s the largest USAAF  facility in Europe, operating RB-45 nuclear bombers.

Now we hear the Americans are pulling out of Mildenhall, Alconbury and Molesworth, all further south and west.

The Yankee occupation of East Anglia (1942-2015) is coming to its logical conclusion. No more “Overpaid, over-sexed, over here”.

The map will show more disused airfields, each filling — no doubt — with red-brick speculative housing, lorry parks and warehousing. Very boring, especially compared to the whiff of  aviation fuel, the accents of Georgia and the Mid-West complaining of warm English beer, produce escaped from the commissary into a country recovering from post-war rationing, the flashing fishtails of Chevrolets, the noise of tactical nukes passing overhead, or the glimpse of a U-2 spy-plane.

And there is that persistent myth, which Prestwick will always deny, that Elvis Presley did a flying visit through Mildenhall.

That would be worthy of a marker on the map.

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Filed under History, Norfolk, United States, Wells-next-the-Sea

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